Genworth Joins the List of Carriers Restricting In Force Ledgers

Since the beginning of the year, we have written about two carriers restricting their in force ledgers.  John Hancock recently noted a “temporary” situation on its Performance UL policies issued in certain states from 2003 to 2010, and alerted us that current assumption illustrations were unavailable for those policies.  Current assumption illustrations are those based on the current interest being credited and the current cost of insurance (COI) being charged on a policy.  In March of this year, Transamerica alerted us that they would “only run illustrations based on the guaranteed maximum charges and the guaranteed minimum interest rate” on a block of in force policies.  We noted that this was the second time that Transamerica placed restrictions on a block of policies.  The prior restriction was a precursor to a cost of insurance increase. 

Last week, our servicing team in Iowa received notice from Genworth that they would be unable to provide current assumption illustrations on a policy we manage.  They noted “existing illustration regulations” which limited them to only providing illustration projections “based on contractually guaranteed interest and cost of insurance, i.e., the lowest interest and highest cost of insurance rates allowed by your policy.”

We caution reading too much into this Genworth notice as the restriction appears to be limited and no COI increase has been announced.  We will, however, be tracking all the referenced policies for any changes in their cost structure.

Principle Based Reserving May Affect New Life Insurance Policy Pricing Going Forward

A new methodology for calculating policy reserves for life insurance policies has taken effect. The new methodology grew out of the 2009 National Association of Insurance Commissioners (NAIC) revisions to the Model Standard Valuation Law. Dubbed Principle-Based Reserving (PBR), the law was to take effect on the first day of the next calendar year if 42 states enacted the revisions by July 1st. The threshold was passed in 2016 and as of today, 46 states have adopted the revised laws.

Insurance companies are required to set aside reserves to pay future claims, and the reserve requirements are specified by state regulation and laws. The current method of reserving will remain unchanged for in force business, as PBR only affects policies issued on or after January 1, 2017. However, life insurers will have three years to implement the new methodology. Currently, the requirements will be altered for life insurance policies only, but over time they are expected to apply to other products as well.

According to information provided by the NAIC (1), the new approach will lessen the need for changes to regulations and laws as new products are introduced. Under the new methodology, states would “establish principles upon which reserves are to be based rather than specific formulas.” Under the current formula, the risks, liabilities and obligations are not always correctly “reflected,” and “for some products this leads to excessive conservatism in reserve calculations, for others it results in inadequate reserves.” A study by the NAIC disclosed the new method will lower reserves for competitive level premium term insurance. Universal life policies with secondary guarantees will see both “higher and lower reserve requirements,” which was not unexpected, “given the variations in company interpretations of the reserve requirements for this product type that were in effect when this study was done.” Per the study, reserves for most other products, including current assumption universal life and whole life, will remain relatively unchanged.

Reserve requirements are only one of the many factors affecting the pricing of life insurance. Others factors include mortality expenses and investment returns, along with overhead expenses, other than reserving.

While it remains to be seen exactly how pricing will be affected, the NAIC believes the “right sizing” of reserves will benefit consumers since holding higher reserves tends to increase costs, and holding reserves that are too low puts the consumer at risk. The new regulations will also allow for the introduction of new products that could offer multi-benefits and more flexibility for consumers.

For those of us managing in force life insurance, the new methodology will change little, though new and replacement products going forward may be more or less attractive because of pricing changes.

1.) PBR Educational Brief, June 21,2013, The National Association of Insurance Commissioners, and The Center for Insurance Policy and Research

The Prince Estate Sells His Music Vault, How Will That Affect His Legacy?

In 2004, Prince took part in a ceremony honoring George Harrison at the Rock and Roll Hall of Fame.  Sharing the stage with such rock luminaries as Steve Winwood, Tom Petty, and Jeff Lynne, Prince joined the group in a rendition of “While My Guitar Gently Weeps” by providing firepower on the song’s guitar solo, and he did not disappoint.  About halfway through the six minute and fifteen second YouTube video, Dhani Harrison, George’s son, smiles at Prince, knowing what is to come. Prince then launches into a three-minute performance in which he doesn’t just play notes, but makes the guitar an extension of his body.  Great guitarists make it look easy – it just flows, and that night it did for Prince.  By the time the last note rang out, with Prince tossing his vintage Fender Telecaster into the audience, the members understood what a singular talent he was.

Most people don’t think of Prince as a great guitarist, they remember him for his songs, and not just the songs he made famous like “Little Red Corvette,” “Purple Rain,” and “1999,” but also the songs he wrote for others.  “Nothing Compares 2 U” made Sinead O’Connor a star – briefly.  He gave the Bangles arguably their biggest hit with “Just Another Manic Monday,” a tune he wrote under the pseudonym of Christopher.

Prince did not have a home studio, he had a 60,000-square foot entertainment complex as his home –  he literally lived in the studio.  He put out 39 albums and contributed to many more recordings during his lifetime, but the vault he left behind included even more than that. He battled throughout his career to manage the creation and the delivery of his music on his terms – passing up millions to ensure that he alone controlled his art.

He was a prolific songwriter and like anyone prolific in his or her craft, among the many gems there will be clunkers. Which is why it was upsetting to read that his estate had signed a $30M deal giving Universal Music Group access to the vault.

Many articles have been written about the estate planning mistakes Prince made as he did little right in that area.  His money, estimated at more than $150 million (2), may not have gone to the right people or causes, but I imagine it is the possible tarnishing of his music that would be most disturbing to him.  I suspect we will soon hear songs Prince never intended to see the light of day – at least not without his special polish.

In the end, that is his estate planning failure – someone who spent his life attempting to control the most important thing in his life, his music, lost control in death.

Estate planning focuses on lowering taxes and maximizing assets for the next generation, but for many the most important asset left behind is legacy.   Let’s hope his lives on as he would have wanted.

  1. Auctions for Prince’s Music Leaves Some Bidders Feeling Left Out, WSJ, March 27, 2017
  2. Bankrate.com

TOLI Trustees Need To Be Aware Of Life Settlements

It is estimated that every year, seniors in the US surrender or lapse over $112 billion dollars in life insurance death benefits (1). Most of them probably have no idea of their options, but grow tired of the premium payments and walk away without maximizing the value of an asset they may have paid for over a lifetime. For the uninformed consumer, this could be just a lost opportunity, for the Trust Owned Life Insurance (TOLI) trustee, this can be a source of potential liability.

An alternative to a policy lapse or surrender is a life settlement, the sale of a life insurance policy for a lump sum greater than the policy’s cash value and less than the death benefit. The purchaser of the policy will maintain the policy by paying the policy premium until the death of the insured.

The life settlement industry grew out of the “viatical” movement of the of the 1980s when AIDS victims were given the opportunity to sell their life insurance policies to a third party for a lump sum payment to be used to provide medical and other care in the final years, sometimes months, of life. Advances in the treatment of AIDS made these types of policy sales less common, but the idea of life insurance as an asset that can be sold grew into the life settlement, or secondary marketplace, we see today.

Originally the industry was lightly regulated and some who sold their policies were taken advantage of, but today’s life insurance settlement marketplace is heavily controlled. The vast majority of states (42) have strict regulations that provide a framework for the orderly transfer of policies, with required consumer disclosures that protect the policy seller. The improved regulations have dramatically decreased issues in the sales process.

For the TOLI trustee managing life insurance today, life settlements are an option that must be considered. Because of changes in the estate tax, increased policy costs, and the natural evolution of trust goals, there are more “unwanted” policies to deal with than ever. Those of you who have attended our ITM TwentyFirst University sessions in the past know that we have developed many methods for analyzing options to maximize the value of a life insurance policy. We do this because it is our clients’ (TOLI trustees) responsibility to maximize the value for their clients (life insurance trust beneficiaries), and life settlements can be a way to do that.

Typically, life settlements are available to insureds age 65 and older, though health will play an important role in whether an offer is forthcoming. Most policies sold are universal life policies – especially current assumption universal life, though other policies, even term insurance policies that can be converted to a permanent policy, can be sold. The offers depend on the death benefit of the policy, the annual premium needed to carry the policy, the life expectancy of the insured, and the rate of return that the buyer needs to make the purchase a viable investment.

The sale of a policy has potential tax implications to the seller. A life insurance policy held in trust until a death benefit is paid is received income and estate tax free, however if a policy is sold there is a possible tax liability to the trust.

While all the advantages and disadvantages of a policy sale are beyond the scope of this article, we believe that the full discussion of life settlements in the TOLI world is important enough to schedule a webinar session that will provide a TOLI trustee (and all financial professionals) with a thorough understanding of the process. Our next free webinar session, entitled Learning When Why and How to Do a Life Settlement, will be held on March 28th at 2 p.m. Eastern Time, and will provide one hour of continuing education for CFP, CTFA and FIRMA members. You can register here.

  1. LifeHealthPRO, February 25, 2015, Forfeited Life Insurance Benefits Pegged at $112 Billion

ITM TwentyFirst Hires New Business Development Specialist for the Northeast to Meet Growing Demand for Life Insurance Trust Outsourcing Solutions

February 14, 2017 – Minneapolis, MN – ITM TwentyFirst – www.itm21st.com 
ITM TwentyFirst, a leading provider of life insurance trust services to financial institutions, today announced the hiring of Walt Lotspeich, a 20-year trust industry veteran based in the Philadelphia area. Walt will be responsible for new business development and sales focusing on the Northeast corridor.
 
Over the last few years, there has been a surge in demand from financial institutions to outsource their trust owned life insurance operations. Increasing regulatory pressures and a shift in focus to more profitable lines of trust business have contributed to the demand. Kurt Gearhart, CEO of ITM TwentyFirst, noted that “For years, Walt has been helping financial institutions implement solutions for different aspects of their trust operations. We are excited to have Walt join ITM TwentyFirst and work with our clients and financial institutions seeking help with their life insurance trusts.”
 
Prior to joining ITM TwentyFirst, Walt spent over a decade as a business development professional offering investment and outsource servicing solutions to banks and trust companies.
 
Earlier in his career, Walt started as an intern at a private trust company and ultimately ended up managing the Trust Operations unit.
 
Walt is originally from Parksley, VA, and is a proud alumnus of Elon University in North Carolina.  He and his wife, Natalie, live in Drexel Hill, PA with their two basset hound dogs. Walt’s interests include sailing, golf and listening to live music.
 
About ITM TwentyFirst:

ITM TwentyFirst helps banks, trust companies, advisors and investors manage in-force life insurance policies and life insurance trusts. The more than 150 team members at ITM TwentyFirst administer over 25,000 policies for more than 200 institutional clients.

 
 
walt
Walt Lotspeich
New Business Development Manager
P: 319-553-6269

Nationwide Cost Of Insurance Lawsuit May Leave You Scratching Your Head

Last July, a lawsuit was filed against Nationwide Life Insurance Company of America alleging the carrier “made false representations and omissions of material facts regarding the cost of insurance charges and cost of insurance rates” for two variable life policies. The plaintiffs in the case included the grantor of a life insurance trust, who was also the insured, his daughter, Laura, who was the trustee as well as the agent of record on the policies.

A life insurance trust created in 1994 purchased one $500,000 policy that year, and another in 1996. According to court documents, two decades later, in 2014, the plaintiffs determined that there might be a problem with the policies, when a review of the policies’ quarterly statements disclosed that “policy charges were eroding the policies’ account values.” Although the original suit mentions that a variable policy allows the owner to allocate the cash value among an array of “separate accounts,” it does not mention the rates of return obtained in the policies, or if they suffered any market losses.

According to the complaint, after attempting to gather information from the carrier as to how the cost of insurance was calculated, Laura was told by the carrier’s Office of Compliance that she would be “unable to get that question answered.”

In April of 2015, the plaintiffs sent a letter to the carrier concerning their issues around the cost of insurance and the carrier’s “false representations and omissions.” Although the letter specifically said that the claims outlined in the letter were not claims against Laura, Nationwide filed a Uniform Termination Notice against her, stating that a written complaint was filed for “misrepresentation in the purchase of a variable life insurance policy.” The plaintiffs believed this was “an egregious and abusive act of retaliation” against Laura.

The plaintiffs claimed breach of contract and fraud among other charges. The policies provide that “current cost of insurance rates” are determined “based on . . . expectations as to future mortality costs and expenses.” However, according to the suit, the carrier, “repeatedly has increased the amount of the cost of insurance charges deducted . . . for reasons wholly unrelated to changes in future expectations.”

The lawsuit pointed out the policies had “exorbitant” COI increases with “the monthly cost of insurance charges deducted by Nationwide from the policies” increasing “substantially each year (except for one year)” in both policies. The total COI percentage increases from initial policy issue until 2016 were 430% in the 1994 policy and 398% in the 1996 policy. According to the suit, the increased costs “wholly unrelated to changes in future expectations” caused the policies cash values to be “drastically eroded” leaving the policies “in imminent danger of lapsing.”

The suit asked for “compensatory damages in the form of two paid up life insurance policies … (with no future premiums required), each with a death benefit of $500,000 plus the cash value of the policy.” Note: Both variable policies were issued as Option B, which pays the stated death benefit, plus the cash value in the policy at death.

While it is clear that the cost of insurance went up almost every year since policy issue, it is not clear that the actual “cost per thousand” charges were higher than shown in the original policy “as sold” illustrations, as with other COI increase cases like Transamerica and AXA. We, at ITM TwentyFirst, have been unable to determine any COI increases in the Nationwide variable life policies that we manage, except for the year to year increases that are seen in every universal life chassis product that reflect the increasing age of the insured.

In Nationwide’s Motion to Dismiss filed August 31, 2016, the carrier characterized the case as “buyer’s remorse,” with plaintiffs creating a “reason to walk away . . . free of charge” after obtaining 20 years of “valuable life insurance coverage,” and taking the position that Nationwide was “required to charge the same amount for . . . coverage every year,” which is “contradicted by the plain terms of the policies.” Nationwide pointed out that the trustee was “a sophisticated consumer,” a life insurance agent who purchased the policies “in her capacity as Trustee.”

Nationwide included over 140 pages in their motion exhibit that included both policy contracts and copies of statements received by the plaintiffs over the years, illustrating policy performance and the increasing cost of insurance. The motion also included contract language that specified “cost of insurance rates are based on the Insured’s Attained Age, Sex, Premium Class and Duration,” language that was not included in the original plaintiff’s complaint, a “major omission,” according to Nationwide.

On January 9th of this year, Warren Eginton, Senior United State District Judge, US District Court for the district of Connecticut, denied Nationwide’s motion. On February 1st of this year, the same judge issued a Stipulated Order that FINRA would “expunge the U5 Amendment” against Laura and the agent/trustee would drop any complaints against FINRA, with each party bearing their own legal costs.

Unlike many COI increase lawsuits we have written about in the past, this is not a class action suit, and it may find its way to a confidential settlement before a final verdict, but if it does not, the outcome will be interesting. We will be providing updates as they unfold.

Illustration Restrictions Placed On Some John Hancock Inforce Policies

In the past we have written about limitations on obtaining ledgers to manage inforce life insurance.  In one instance the inability to provide in-force ledgers based on “current assumptions” was a precursor to a cost of insurance (COI) increase.

Our servicing team recently received notice that due to a “temporary” situation John Hancock cannot provide inforce ledgers on its Performance UL Policies issued in particular states from 2003 to 2010.

According to the information received from the carrier, they are unable to provide this information because “regulatory standards that govern illustration practices…prevent us from illustrating currently payable amounts based on our current non-guaranteed elements.”

John Hancock is “reviewing the non-guaranteed elements applied to these Policies because emerging experience has differed from the current assumptions which are reflected in the illustrations” and it expects the review to be completed “in the first half of 2017.”

The carrier notes that if the review results in “changes to Non-Guaranteed Elements such changes will not take effect before the policy anniversary immediately after the completion of the review.”

While we do not wish to speculate on the future actions of a highly rated and respected carrier, we will be closely monitoring the situation.